A Guide Navigating Redundancy
  • Publish Date: Posted 5 months ago
  • Author:by Dan Stargatt

A Guide to Navigating Redundancy

​Facing redundancy is a challenging and often overwhelming experience that can leave you feeling uncertain about your future. In this article, we'll look at constructive steps you can take when you've been made redundant, helping you to get your career back on track as quickly as possible. ​Embrace Your Emotions The first step in dealing with redundancy is to acknowledge and embrace your emotions. It's entirely normal to feel a mix of emotions, including shock, anger or anxiety. Take the time to process these feelings and seek support from friends and family if needed. Remember that it's okay to grieve the loss of your previous job before moving forward. ​Another thing to consider is “why you have been made redundant?” Redundancy isn’t always down to poor individual performance. It could be down to a strategic move by the business where they have redesigned the organisational structure, it could also be down to needing to cut overheads. If this is the case then don’t allow this to make you feel like you aren’t good at your job, it is more than likely not the case. ​Update Your CV and LinkedIn Profile Update your CV with your latest accomplishments, skills and experiences. Also, ensure your LinkedIn profile is current and showcases your expertise. A polished online presence can attract potential employers and networking opportunities. ​It is also important to share your redundancy on your CV and give context to why you were made redundant. Being upfront and honest is important as the truth will always come out during the recruitment process, so make sure you are in control of the situation and prevent any surprises which can negatively impact your chances of securing a new role. ​Network and Seek Support Networking is a powerful tool during a job search. Reach out to former colleagues, friends and industry contacts. Don't hesitate to ask for support, many people are willing to help during challenging times. ​Engage with a recruitment agency Engaging with a recruitment agency when you've been made redundant can significantly enhance your job search and increase your chances of finding new a new role. The Recruitment Consultant you choose to work with will be able to have conversations with clients that may not be actively recruiting, but are always open to bringing talent into their team, if the right candidate becomes available. This is a great benefit of working with a recruitment agency, as this often leads to less competition for particular roles, giving you a better chance of securing a new role. ​A Recruitment Consultant will also support you and champion you when speaking to potential employers. Having someone fight your corner is a great confidence booster and can add more weight to your applications. ​ We also asked Warren Drobac, Director at Navartis what advice he offers candidates when they find themselves in the position of looking for a new role after being made redundant. Warren has over 13 years’ of experience in recruitment and has helped many candidates that were made redundant find new roles…. ​“Before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a negative connotation attached to redundancy. However, in the past few years, redundancy has become more prevalent due to the economic fluctuations we have encountered. The associated stigma has gradually diminished. With an increasing number of businesses facing cash flow challenges and the need to cut costs, redundancy has become a common strategy for survival. ​Historically, being made redundant could carry the assumption that the individual was underperforming. However, in the majority of cases, this is not accurate. Often, it is the role that is made redundant rather than any shortcomings of the individual. In certain situations, it serves as a necessary step to sustain the business. While experiencing redundancy is never pleasant, it should not be viewed solely as a negative. Discussing a redundancy openly with prospective employers should not adversely affect the interview process.” ​Looking for a new job? If your CV is ready to go then we have a huge number of great opportunities available across the Construction, Civil Engineering, Rail, Power and Telecoms sectors. Search and apply for your next job now. ​Browse jobs

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​Facing redundancy is a challenging and often overwhelming experience that can leave you feeling uncertain about your future. In this article, we'll look at constructive steps you can take when you've been made redundant, helping you to get your career back on track as quickly as possible.

Embrace Your Emotions

The first step in dealing with redundancy is to acknowledge and embrace your emotions. It's entirely normal to feel a mix of emotions, including shock, anger or anxiety. Take the time to process these feelings and seek support from friends and family if needed. Remember that it's okay to grieve the loss of your previous job before moving forward.

Another thing to consider is “why you have been made redundant?” Redundancy isn’t always down to poor individual performance. It could be down to a strategic move by the business where they have redesigned the organisational structure, it could also be down to needing to cut overheads. If this is the case then don’t allow this to make you feel like you aren’t good at your job, it is more than likely not the case.

Update Your CV and LinkedIn Profile

Update your CV with your latest accomplishments, skills and experiences. Also, ensure your LinkedIn profile is current and showcases your expertise. A polished online presence can attract potential employers and networking opportunities.

It is also important to share your redundancy on your CV and give context to why you were made redundant. Being upfront and honest is important as the truth will always come out during the recruitment process, so make sure you are in control of the situation and prevent any surprises which can negatively impact your chances of securing a new role.

Network and Seek Support

Networking is a powerful tool during a job search. Reach out to former colleagues, friends and industry contacts. Don't hesitate to ask for support, many people are willing to help during challenging times.

Engage with a recruitment agency

Engaging with a recruitment agency when you've been made redundant can significantly enhance your job search and increase your chances of finding new a new role. The Recruitment Consultant you choose to work with will be able to have conversations with clients that may not be actively recruiting, but are always open to bringing talent into their team, if the right candidate becomes available. This is a great benefit of working with a recruitment agency, as this often leads to less competition for particular roles, giving you a better chance of securing a new role.

A Recruitment Consultant will also support you and champion you when speaking to potential employers. Having someone fight your corner is a great confidence booster and can add more weight to your applications.

We also asked Warren Drobac, Director at Navartis what advice he offers candidates when they find themselves in the position of looking for a new role after being made redundant. Warren has over 13 years’ of experience in recruitment and has helped many candidates that were made redundant find new roles….

“Before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a negative connotation attached to redundancy. However, in the past few years, redundancy has become more prevalent due to the economic fluctuations we have encountered. The associated stigma has gradually diminished. With an increasing number of businesses facing cash flow challenges and the need to cut costs, redundancy has become a common strategy for survival.

Historically, being made redundant could carry the assumption that the individual was underperforming. However, in the majority of cases, this is not accurate. Often, it is the role that is made redundant rather than any shortcomings of the individual. In certain situations, it serves as a necessary step to sustain the business. While experiencing redundancy is never pleasant, it should not be viewed solely as a negative. Discussing a redundancy openly with prospective employers should not adversely affect the interview process.”

Looking for a new job?

If your CV is ready to go then we have a huge number of great opportunities available across the Construction, Civil Engineering, Rail, Power and Telecoms sectors. Search and apply for your next job now.

Browse jobs